Monthly Archives: October 2015

Changes to the California Franchise Relations Act

On October 11, 2015, California Governor Jerry Brown signed California bill AB 525 into law, amending the California Franchise Relations Act, and imposing additional constraints upon the franchisor-franchisee relationship. The new restrictions are not retroactive, but will apply to any franchise agreement that is entered into or renewed on or after January 1, 2016 or to franchises of an indefinite duration which may be terminated without cause.

First and foremost, the new law makes it more difficult for franchisors to terminate a franchise agreement for good cause. The law changes the definition of “good cause” for termination from “failure of the franchisee to comply with any lawful requirements imposed upon the franchisee by the franchise agreement” to “failure of the franchisee to substantially comply with any lawful requirements imposed upon the franchisee by the franchise agreement.” Additionally, once the franchisee is given notice of the failure, the franchisee is allowed sixty (60) days to cure the failure, which doubles the thirty (30) day requirement in the prior law.

Next, the new law prohibits franchise agreements from preventing the sale or transfer of the franchise as long as the buyer is qualified under the standards the franchisor uses to approve new or renewing franchisees. Under the new law, the franchisor must provide the franchisee the standards it uses for approving new or renewing franchisees. Once notified by the franchisee of the pending transfer, the franchisor has sixty (60) days to approve or disapprove the sale or transfer.

Finally, subject to certain exclusions, the new law requires franchisors who terminate or fail to renew a franchise to purchase all of the inventory, supplies, equipment, fixtures, and furnishings acquired under the terms of the franchise agreement. Additionally, if it is found that the franchisor improperly terminated the agreement or failed to renew, the franchisor will be liable for damages, including “the fair market value of the franchised business and the franchise assets, and any other damages caused” by the violation.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss how this new law may impact your franchise.

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